District-wide matter: Signage


District Plan Review consultation now closed.

Initial public consultation on key draft changes to the current Selwyn District Plan closed on Monday 8 October 2018. Thank you to everyone who let us know what they thought of the review so far.

What’s next?

Following this initial public consultation on the District Plan Review, the Council will consider all feedback and start developing detailed provisions for the Proposed District Plan. Please note that a summary report on the initial public consultation will be made available on Your Say Selwyn website at www.selwyn.govt.nz/districtplanreview.

It’s expected the Proposed District Plan will be

District Plan Review consultation now closed.

Initial public consultation on key draft changes to the current Selwyn District Plan closed on Monday 8 October 2018. Thank you to everyone who let us know what they thought of the review so far.

What’s next?

Following this initial public consultation on the District Plan Review, the Council will consider all feedback and start developing detailed provisions for the Proposed District Plan. Please note that a summary report on the initial public consultation will be made available on Your Say Selwyn website at www.selwyn.govt.nz/districtplanreview.

It’s expected the Proposed District Plan will be notified in early 2020 for formal public consultation. The longer timeframe is due to the local government elections at the end of 2019 and ensuring the newly elected Council endorses the Proposed District Plan before it gets notified.


We want to know what you think about the draft changes to signage related rules and policies in the current District Plan. These draft changes have been endorsed by the Selwyn District Council for further development as part of its District Plan Review.

How can I have a say?

To give us your feedback on the draft changes , you can:

There will be many consultation opportunities for feedback at different stages of the District Plan Review and this is the first such opportunity. It’s expected that the new District Plan will be notified in early 2020 and be fully in place, subject to any Environment Court appeals, in March 2022.

Background

Signage in the current District Plan

There are a number of types of signage, for a wide range of purposes that are managed by the District Plan. For example, there are directional signs (eg street naming signs), health and safety signs (eg hazard warning signs), temporary signs (eg real estate and events) and advertising signs.

Complaints about signage are one of the most common matters raised with the Council’s monitoring and enforcement officers. Concerns raised are generally about signage in residential or rural environments which is used to advertise commercial businesses or events.


  • Key draft changes for the future District Plan

    10 months ago
    The Council’s District Plan Committee has endorsed the following key draft changes for further development:
    • Consolidate all signage rules into a single district-wide chapter in the Proposed Plan.
    • Have more restrictive rules to better manage the adverse effects of:
    1. signage not related to a site that they’re placed on such as billboards, trailer-mounted signs, small advertising signs, and temporary signage;
    2. on-Council signage on Council land (ie sandwich boards in road reserve); and
    3. digital signage in rural and residential environments, which is a new and rapidly emerging technology that was not available when the current District Plan was prepared.
    The Council’s District Plan Committee has endorsed the following key draft changes for further development:
    • Consolidate all signage rules into a single district-wide chapter in the Proposed Plan.
    • Have more restrictive rules to better manage the adverse effects of:
    1. signage not related to a site that they’re placed on such as billboards, trailer-mounted signs, small advertising signs, and temporary signage;
    2. on-Council signage on Council land (ie sandwich boards in road reserve); and
    3. digital signage in rural and residential environments, which is a new and rapidly emerging technology that was not available when the current District Plan was prepared.
    • Have a bylaw or potentially more permissive rules for signage in Council parks and reserves.
    • Revise the signage controls adjacent to arterial roads and state highways to better reflect the NZ Transport Agency’s current guidance regarding traffic safety.

    With the above draft changes we’re seeking a better balance between allowing signage within certain environments, such as commercial and industrial sites or council parks and reserves where it’s a normal and necessary part of business or serves a functional need, and being more restrictive in more sensitive environments, such as rural and residential areas where the look and feel of these environments can be more affected by signage.





  • Summary of key issues with the current District Plan

    10 months ago

    As a result of the review of current policies and rules specific to signage, we’ve identified the following issues with the current District plan:

    • The rules are spread across the Plan and are not contained in a single chapter like most other District Plans.
    • The rules don’t provide clear direction and control for signage that isn’t related to a particular site. Typical examples of such signs include trailer-mounted advertising signs parked adjacent to busy roads and intersections, large billboards for advertising purposes and small advertising signs located on fences and other structures. These signs can have an impact on the...

    As a result of the review of current policies and rules specific to signage, we’ve identified the following issues with the current District plan:

    • The rules are spread across the Plan and are not contained in a single chapter like most other District Plans.
    • The rules don’t provide clear direction and control for signage that isn’t related to a particular site. Typical examples of such signs include trailer-mounted advertising signs parked adjacent to busy roads and intersections, large billboards for advertising purposes and small advertising signs located on fences and other structures. These signs can have an impact on the look and feel of an area and traffic safety.
    • Signage on Council-owned roads, parks and reserves could be more efficiently and clearly controlled by a Council Bylaw or clearer rules in the District Plan. For example, signs for naming and directional purposes related to local parks often have a functional need and serve a public good and therefore could be more enabled.
    • Temporary signage needs to be better managed to avoid the proliferation of such signage, especially at prominent intersections. Examples include signs erected to advertise upcoming events.
    • The rules provide limited control regarding digital signage which is a new and rapidly emerging technology.
    • The rules relating to signage next to state highways do not reflect the NZ Transport Agency’s current guidance on traffic safety.
    • The rules do not provide sufficient or clear control of non-council signage located on Council land, ie sandwich boards on footpaths.