Proposed Selwyn District Plan

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We are a step closer to a new Selwyn District Plan. We have just notified the Proposed Selwyn District Plan for formal public consultation. See the official public notice (please note that we have extended the submission period by one week, from 4 December to 5pm Friday 11 December).

The Proposed Plan is a rule book which sets what people can and can’t do in the district. Now is time for you to help shape the future district you and your children will live and work in.

On this web page you can find information about the Proposed District Plan, how it might affect you and how you can make a submission.

Important note: Proposed ePlan doesn’t work in Internet Explorer browser. It works best in Google Chrome but also in Edge, Safari or Firefox browser. Don't have Chrome? Just click here to download. Once you’ve installed Chrome, make sure you copy and paste www.selwyn.govt.nz/proposedeplan into the Chrome browser window as clicking the link will still take you to Internet Explorer if it’s been set up as your default internet browser. To find out how to change your default browser, go here.)
Have your say by 5pm on 11 December 2020.












We are a step closer to a new Selwyn District Plan. We have just notified the Proposed Selwyn District Plan for formal public consultation. See the official public notice (please note that we have extended the submission period by one week, from 4 December to 5pm Friday 11 December).

The Proposed Plan is a rule book which sets what people can and can’t do in the district. Now is time for you to help shape the future district you and your children will live and work in.

On this web page you can find information about the Proposed District Plan, how it might affect you and how you can make a submission.

Important note: Proposed ePlan doesn’t work in Internet Explorer browser. It works best in Google Chrome but also in Edge, Safari or Firefox browser. Don't have Chrome? Just click here to download. Once you’ve installed Chrome, make sure you copy and paste www.selwyn.govt.nz/proposedeplan into the Chrome browser window as clicking the link will still take you to Internet Explorer if it’s been set up as your default internet browser. To find out how to change your default browser, go here.)
Have your say by 5pm on 11 December 2020.












  • Still time to have your say

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    01 Dec 2020

    There’s less than two weeks left to have your say on the Proposed Selwyn District Plan.

    The Proposed Plan is basically a ‘rule book’ for what you can or can’t do in the district and what may require a resource consent from the Council.

    The plan takes account of the rapid and continuing growth we’ve seen in Selwyn in the last decade and sets rules and policies for where that growth should occur. It aims to help ensure the district continues to grow in a way that meets your needs and those of people moving to join in the great lifestyle and opportunities Selwyn offers.

    The Proposed Plan provides a framework for growth and unlocks the economic potential of our district in a sustainable way over the next 10 to 15 years. It provides direction for how townships should grow, and where and what kind of businesses and industries are encouraged.

    It also simplifies the zones that help guide what you can and can’t build, maps the risk from natural hazards such as flooding and liquefaction, identifies our heritage sites, buildings and trees and proposes rules to protect our landscape and night sky, Council Environmental and Regulatory Services Planning Manager Ben Rhodes says.

    “These are key decisions about where we’re going and what life will look like in the district, so we really want to hear from you.”

    “So far we’ve seen a lot of interest in our drop-in sessions and community events, with hundreds of you talking to our planners and asking questions, and we’ve also received 35 submissions. Key areas of interest to date include queries about rezoning or subdividing land, designations, flooding hazard and family flats.”

    You can find out more and make a submission on the plan until 5pm Friday 11 December.

  • Considering starting a new home business?

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    27 Nov 2020
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    The Proposed District Plan includes some new proposed rules that may affect people starting a new business from home.

    Under the proposed plan running a business from home continues to be a permitted activity in both rural and residential areas, but some rules around when you may need a resource consent are proposed to change.

    The main change is around the size your business premises can be before you need to apply for a resource consent. New home businesses will not need a resource consent if there are no more than two staff who live off-site and the maximum floor area used for the business is under 100m2 in a rural zone, or 40m2 if you’re in a residential zone.

    In residentially-zoned areas, the proposed rules would mean business activity involving customer visits and/or deliveries, could only occur between 7.30am–7pm and all business goods would need to be stored indoors. In the current District Plan business activity involving visits by customers and clients, is limited to between 7am–10pm on any day.

    In rurally-zoned areas, business activity involving customer visits and/or deliveries, could occur between 7am–7pm. In the current District Plan there are no limits on hours of the operation in the Rural Zone.

    The changes being proposed are aimed at ensuring that home businesses don’t potentially adversely affect the look and feel of residential or rural areas. The changes are also aimed at striking a better balance between making it easy to set up a home business and encouraging bigger businesses to locate in the district’s commercial and business centres.

    It is important to note that these changes would only apply to those starting a new home business and will not have effect until the proposed plan is operational, which is expected to happen by the end of 2022. If you currently run a business from home, you will not be affected by the proposed change of rules.

    Anyone interested in finding out more about how the proposed changes to starting a new home business affect them please contact the Council by calling 0800 SELWYN (735 996) or emailing contactus@selwyn.govt.nz. You can make a submission until 5pm Friday 11 December.

  • Looking after our heritage

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    11 Nov 2020

    Selwyn has experienced several waves of settlement by Māori and Europeans over many decades. As a result there are sites, buildings and structures in our district which are of cultural or historic value to individuals, families, iwi, rūnanga and communities.

    It’s important we look after all the things and places that are part of our history and identity, and preserve them for current and future generations to enjoy and learn from.

    The Proposed District Plan updates the list of heritage buildings and notable trees as well as identifying and including new rules to recognise and protect sites and areas of significance to Māori. Key proposed changes – historic and cultural heritage:

    • Updated schedule of listed heritage buildings, structures and items
    • A heritage item’s setting will now also be part of the listing, which means erecting buildings and structures, and some earthworks within the setting, will be managed
    • Updated schedule of listed notable trees
    • Updated criteria to help identify notable trees for listing in the District Plan
    • Overall the rules for listed heritage items and notable trees aren’t proposed to change much, other than the requirement to manage some activities in the setting of a heritage item
    • The sites and areas of significance to Māori identified in the Proposed District Plan largely reflect those that are identified in the operative District Plan. However, one change is the inclusion of a Ngā Turanga Tūpuna area – covering Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere, its margins and associated wetlands, along with the coastal area between the Rakaia River and Taumutu
    • New rules to recognise and protect sites and areas of significance to Māori. These rules manage a number of activities, eg erecting new buildings or structures, whereas the current District Plan only manages earthworks.

    For more about how the Proposed District Plan plans to protect heritage items view the Proposed ePlan. Submissions are open till 5pm Friday 11 December. You can make your submission here.

  • Proposed District Plan - Know your natural hazards

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    03 Nov 2020
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    Selwyn is a district with a rich and diverse environment which is also exposed to a number of natural hazards.

    The Proposed Selwyn District Plan - currently out for public consultation - maps natural hazards areas across Selwyn, based on the latest data and to meet regulatory requirements.

    “It’s important that we know what natural hazards we face in the district, so that we can make informed decisions on future property, land and infrastructure development”, says Council Planner Rachael Carruthers. She’s one of the team of planners who has developed the Proposed District Plan.

    All councils in New Zealand are required to identify and manage areas at risk from natural hazards.

    “All councils in Canterbury must assess the risks from more extreme weather events than what the current District Plan does. We also need to take into account climate change effects over the next 100 years, such as increased frequency and intensity of rainstorms”, says Rachael.

    “As a result we have now identified around 80 percent of properties in the district as being at risk of flooding that would potentially be at least five centimetres deep during a 200-year flood event.”

    In addition to providing landowners with the information where on their property flooding risk exists, the Proposed Plan includes rules on how this risk should be managed.

    “We’re proposing to manage flood risk with similar restrictions to what’s in the current District Plan.”

    “For most properties the proposed changes won’t likely make much of a difference. The changes will only affect those who want to do something new on their land, such as build a new house or subdivide,” Rachael says.

    The key proposed change is for the district-wide minimum building floor height to increase to 300 mm above a 200-year flood level event (instead of the current requirement of 300 mm above a 50-year flood level event).

    For more information on the flooding hazard, check out the Council’s video with Robert Love, Strategy and Policy Team Leader. Make sure you have your say on the Proposed District Plan by 5pm Friday 11 December.


  • District’s rule book gets once in a decade makeover

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    05 Oct 2020
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    People in Selwyn can now read and have their say on the Proposed District Plan. The Proposed Selwyn District Plan is open for consultation until 5pm on Friday 11 December.

    Selwyn Mayor Sam Broughton says the new plan will make huge strides in preparing the district for the future.

    “This is an important move for Selwyn. The District Plan matters, because it impacts all our lives and how we live, work and play in the district. Most of the current plan has been in operation since 2008. Since then we’ve seen massive changes and we need a new plan that is not only up to date with the new world we live in, but ready to take us through the next decade.”

    The District Plan – which sets the rules for what people can do on their properties and what requires resource consent – must be reviewed every 10 years.

    The new plan aims to simplify and make it easier for residents to find out the rules. It also changes the focus from the effects of landowners’ actions on others, to what type of activities people can undertake.

    Among the changes proposed, the plan focuses residential development in and around our existing townships. It allows more housing types in urban areas and removes the requirement that only family members can live in a family flat.

    It proposes reducing the density of houses allowed in part of the Outer Plains, to ensure land is retained for rural production, and tighter rules around businesses in residential and rural areas.

    Daytime noise rules run from 7am to 10pm and sky glow rules reduce light pollution, in particular creating dark-sky zones in areas of the high country, along the coast and around the West Melton Observatory.

    You can read the summary consultation document Because it matters or search your address in the Proposed ePlan and see how the rules affect your property.

    Council planning staff will also be holding drop-in sessions around the district in coming weeks to answer questions.