District-wide matter: Transport


District Plan Review consultation now closed.

Initial public consultation on key draft changes to the current Selwyn District Plan closed on Monday 8 October 2018. Thank you to everyone who let us know what they thought of the review so far.

What’s next?

Following this initial public consultation on the District Plan Review, the Council will consider all feedback and start developing detailed provisions for the Proposed District Plan. Please note that a summary report on the initial public consultation will be made available on Your Say Selwyn website at www.selwyn.govt.nz/districtplanreview.

It’s expected the Proposed District Plan will be

District Plan Review consultation now closed.

Initial public consultation on key draft changes to the current Selwyn District Plan closed on Monday 8 October 2018. Thank you to everyone who let us know what they thought of the review so far.

What’s next?

Following this initial public consultation on the District Plan Review, the Council will consider all feedback and start developing detailed provisions for the Proposed District Plan. Please note that a summary report on the initial public consultation will be made available on Your Say Selwyn website at www.selwyn.govt.nz/districtplanreview.

It’s expected the Proposed District Plan will be notified in early 2020 for formal public consultation. The longer timeframe is due to the local government elections at the end of 2019 and ensuring the newly elected Council endorses the Proposed District Plan before it gets notified.


We want to know what you think about the draft changes to transport related rules and policies in the current District Plan. These draft changes have been endorsed by the Selwyn District Council for further development as part of its District Plan Review.

How can I have a say?

To give us your feedback on the draft changes , you can:

There will be many consultation opportunities for feedback at different stages of the District Plan Review and this is the first such opportunity. It’s expected that the new District Plan will be notified in early 2020 and be fully in place, subject to any Environment Court appeals, in March 2022.

Background

Transport in the current District Plan

The District Plan includes rules to guide how transport is managed within rural areas, settlements and townships, making it a district-wide topic under the District Plan Review.

The current Plan includes a range of road categories based on the road’s function within the network and the levels of service it provides. For example, an Arterial Road will be wide enough to support large volumes of traffic and include sufficient space for a cycle and bus lane, wide berms for walking and cycling and avenue planting, while a Local Minor Road may be a cul de sac or street serving a more intensive housing area with very low vehicle movements, a single footpath and no through connection.

The current District Plan manages activities that take place on roads such as road works, whether they are State Highways managed by the NZ Transport Agency (NZTA), or public roads managed by the Selwyn District Council as the local roading authority. For example, the District Plan includes a number of rules that allow road works to be carried out by NZTA and the Council, as well as network utility providers (such as telecommunications, gas and power companies).

The current Plan also promotes walking, cycling and the use of public transport through design requirements. These aim to ensure there is sufficient space within the road, connections available to enable people to safely move from one location to another and to encourage people of all ages and abilities to walk, cycle and access public transport as an alternative to using private motor vehicles.


  • Key draft changes for the future District Plan

    9 months ago
    Ehq topics 200x150 transport 2

    The Council’s District Plan Committee has recently endorsed the following draft changes for addressing identified issues for further development, which we’re now consulting on:

    • Integrated Transport Assessments (ITAs) are required as part of the resource consent process for certain land developments and will be based on the scale of the development. This will give the Council confidence that activities that are likely to put pressure on the wider transport network are assessed during the consent process and appropriate contributions are made to any road network upgrades.
    • The minimum width of smaller roads (‘Local Minor’ and ‘Local...

    The Council’s District Plan Committee has recently endorsed the following draft changes for addressing identified issues for further development, which we’re now consulting on:

    • Integrated Transport Assessments (ITAs) are required as part of the resource consent process for certain land developments and will be based on the scale of the development. This will give the Council confidence that activities that are likely to put pressure on the wider transport network are assessed during the consent process and appropriate contributions are made to any road network upgrades.
    • The minimum width of smaller roads (‘Local Minor’ and ‘Local Intermediate’), such as cul de sacs and streets serving more intensive housing areas, is to be reviewed. The intention is to increase the permitted width to allow for wider grass berms, footpaths on both sides of the road and to ensure sufficient space for car parking, vehicle manoeuvring (including emergency service and refuse collection vehicles) and wheelie bins.
    • The width of vehicle crossings ie section of driveway at the front of a property, on smaller roads (‘Local Minor’ and ‘Local Intermediate’) is reduced from a maximum width of 6 metres (m) to 3.5 m where the roadside berm is less than 15 m wide.
    • Require footpaths on both sides of all smaller roads (‘Local Minor’ and ‘Local Intermediate’) where there is enough space to promote walking, cycling and access to public transport Single-sided footpaths would need to be assessed through the resource consent process.
    • Require subdivision within intensive housing areas to provide walkable blocks with a maximum 800 m perimeter (rather than the current 1,000 m) to promote walking, cycling and access to public transport.
    • Retain the existing subdivision rules for managing the design of cul de sacs, but introduce a rule that new cul de sacs need to have ‘line of sight’ to adjoining streets to promote well-connected streets and improve pedestrian safety.
    • Encourage cycling by increasing the number, and improve the location and design, of cycle parking spaces in town centres.
    • Include objectives and policies that support public transport by referencing the need for Council to consider the establishment of specific facilities in the district, including Park N’ Ride facilities.

  • Summary of key issues with the current District Plan

    9 months ago
    As a result of the review of current policies and rules specific to transport, we’ve identified the following issues with the current District Plan:
    • There are currently no rules for Integrated Transport Assessments (ITAs) to be required as part of a resource consent. An ITA is a detailed assessment of how a new development could impact on the operation of the wider road network and what contribution the development should make to any upgrades.
    • Smaller roads, such as cul de sacs and streets serving more intensive housing areas, are sometimes not wide enough to provide space for amenity...
    As a result of the review of current policies and rules specific to transport, we’ve identified the following issues with the current District Plan:
    • There are currently no rules for Integrated Transport Assessments (ITAs) to be required as part of a resource consent. An ITA is a detailed assessment of how a new development could impact on the operation of the wider road network and what contribution the development should make to any upgrades.
    • Smaller roads, such as cul de sacs and streets serving more intensive housing areas, are sometimes not wide enough to provide space for amenity strips ie grass berms. This reduces streetscape amenity and the ability to provide footpaths on both sides of the road and space for wheelie bins and vehicles to easily manoeuvre. Wide vehicle crossings on these streets also reduce the area of frontage available for on-street parking.
    • Smaller roads, such as cul de sacs or streets serving more intensive housing development, aren’t providing sufficient space for footpaths, while large neighbourhood blocks are not providing enough pedestrian and cycling connections. In addition, the availability and design of cycle parks in town centres are also proving to be insufficient. These issues are discouraging people from walking and cycling and having safe and convenient access to public transport and other destinations.